For Others vs. For One’s Own Self – A Contrast

Does the banner image on this post resonate with you?

I’m an actual child of the 1970’s and books (and records) like “Free to Be You and Me” were around my childhood home.

I’m going to let the juxtaposition of these two stories speak for itself.

I’ll give you the link and then a key quote from the story.

Then end with a question. And I’ll throw in an image for each too.

Gift of Mask From Retired Farmer…

https://abc7news.com/cuomo-farmer-letter-kansas-from-andrew/6128997/

I’m going to let this summary/commentary from Next Draft’s Dave Pell tell the story:

260,000 Words, Full of Self-Praise, From Trump on the Virus

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/26/us/politics/trump-coronavirus-briefings-analyzed.html?utm_source=nextdraft&utm_medium=email

The New York Times analyzed every word Mr. Trump spoke at his White House briefings and other presidential remarks on the virus — more than 260,000 words — from March 9, when the outbreak began leading to widespread disruptions in daily life, through mid-April. The transcripts show striking patterns and repetitions in the messages he has conveyed, revealing a display of presidential hubris and self-pity unlike anything historians say they have seen before.

By far the most recurring utterances from Mr. Trump in the briefings are self-congratulations, roughly 600 of them, which are often predicated on exaggerations and falsehoods. He does credit others (more than 360 times) for their work, but he also blames others (more than 110 times) for inadequacies in the state and federal response.

Mr. Trump’s attempts to display empathy or appeal to national unity (about 160 instances) amount to only a quarter of the number of times he complimented himself or a top member of his team.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/26/us/politics/trump-coronavirus-briefings-analyzed.html?utm_source=nextdraft&utm_medium=email

To end with that question that I mentioned above:

As a parent, grandparent, or mentor for a child, to which of the above actions and the person doing it, would you point to and say to that child: “See that man – I’d like you to be like him. Do as he does.”

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